#Tinafontaine s #family at her and #FaronHall #vigil. Tina was a 15 yr old #native girl who was found murdered and dumped in the #redriver in a bag on aug 9 2014 #Winnipeg #inm #idlenomore #mmiw #cfs# Nativeamerican #canada #aboriginal

#Tinafontaine s #family at her and #FaronHall #vigil. Tina was a 15 yr old #native girl who was found murdered and dumped in the #redriver in a bag on aug 9 2014 #Winnipeg #inm #idlenomore #mmiw #cfs# Nativeamerican #canada #aboriginal

(via gatitaborrachita)


fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Drop the charges against Palestinian activist Rasmea Odeh now!

Agents of the Department of Homeland Security arrested Odeh on Oct. 22 at her home in Evergreen Park, a suburb of Chicago. Odeh is charged with immigration fraud. Allegedly, in her application for citizenship, she did not mention that she was arrested in Palestine 45 years ago, by an Israeli military court that detains Palestinians without charge - a court that has over 200 children in prison today and does not recognize the rights of Palestinians to due process.

(via thepeoplewillnotstaysilent)


thepeoplesrecord:

Indian burial ground paved over for million dollar housesApril 29, 2014
A treasure trove of Coast Miwok life dating back 4,500 years - older than King Tut’s tomb - was discovered in Marin County and then destroyed to make way for multimillion-dollar homes, archaeologists told The Chronicle this week.
The American Indian burial ground and village site, so rich in history that it was dubbed the “grandfather midden,” was examined and categorized under a shroud of secrecy before construction began this month on the $55 million Rose Lane development in Larkspur.
The 300-foot-long site contained 600 human burials, tools, musical instruments, harpoon tips, spears and throwing sticks from a time long before the introduction of the bow and arrow. The bones of grizzly and black bears were also found, along with a ceremonial California condor burial.
"This was a site of considerable archaeological value," said Dwight Simons, a consulting archaeologist who analyzed 7,200 bones, including the largest collection of bear bones ever found in a prehistoric site in the Bay Area. “My estimate of bones and fragments in the entire site was easily over a million, and probably more than that. It was staggering.”
No artifacts were saved
All of it, including stone tools and idols apparently created for trade with other tribes, was removed, reburied in an undisclosed location on site and apparently graded over, destroying the geologic record and ending any chance of future study, archaeologists said. Not a single artifact was saved.
Lost forever was a carbon-dated record in the soil layers of indigenous life going back approximately to the time the Great Pyramid of Giza was built in Egypt. It was, said several prominent archaeologists, the largest, best-preserved, most ethnologically rich American Indian site found in the Bay Area in at least a century.
"It should have been protected," said Jelmer Eerkens, a professor of archaeology at UC Davis who visited the site as a guest scholar.”The developers have the right to develop their land, but at least the information contained in the site should have been protected and samples should have been saved so that they could be studied in the future.”
The shell mound was first documented in Larkspur in 1907, but no one knew its significance until a developer decided to build homes, prompting an examination of the grounds.
Archaeologists brought in
The development was approved by the city in 2010, but the developer, Larkspur Land 8 Owner LLC, was required under the California Environmental Quality Act to bring in archaeologists to study the shell mound under the direction of American Indian monitors before it could build.
The developers hired San Francisco’s Holman & Associates Archaeological Consultants to conduct an excavation, and that firm spent the past year and a half on the site, calling in 25 archaeologists and 10 other specialists to study aspects of the mound. As required by the environmental act, their work was monitored by the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, who were designated the most likely descendants of Larkspur’s indigenous people.
The American Indian leaders ultimately decided how the findings would be handled, and they defended their decision to remove and rebury the human remains and burial artifacts.
"The philosophy of the tribe in general is that we would like to protect our cultural resources and leave them as is," said Nick Tipon, a longtime member of the Sacred Sites Protection Committee of the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria. “The notion that these cultural artifacts belong to the public is a colonial view.”
But Eerkens and several other top archaeologists said a lot more could have been done to protect the shell mound. The problem was that the work was done under a confidentiality agreement, so little was known about it until March when some of the archaeologists discussed their work during a Society for California Archaeology symposium in Visalia.
Full article

thepeoplesrecord:

Indian burial ground paved over for million dollar houses
April 29, 2014

A treasure trove of Coast Miwok life dating back 4,500 years - older than King Tut’s tomb - was discovered in Marin County and then destroyed to make way for multimillion-dollar homes, archaeologists told The Chronicle this week.

The American Indian burial ground and village site, so rich in history that it was dubbed the “grandfather midden,” was examined and categorized under a shroud of secrecy before construction began this month on the $55 million Rose Lane development in Larkspur.

The 300-foot-long site contained 600 human burials, tools, musical instruments, harpoon tips, spears and throwing sticks from a time long before the introduction of the bow and arrow. The bones of grizzly and black bears were also found, along with a ceremonial California condor burial.

"This was a site of considerable archaeological value," said Dwight Simons, a consulting archaeologist who analyzed 7,200 bones, including the largest collection of bear bones ever found in a prehistoric site in the Bay Area. “My estimate of bones and fragments in the entire site was easily over a million, and probably more than that. It was staggering.”

No artifacts were saved

All of it, including stone tools and idols apparently created for trade with other tribes, was removed, reburied in an undisclosed location on site and apparently graded over, destroying the geologic record and ending any chance of future study, archaeologists said. Not a single artifact was saved.

Lost forever was a carbon-dated record in the soil layers of indigenous life going back approximately to the time the Great Pyramid of Giza was built in Egypt. It was, said several prominent archaeologists, the largest, best-preserved, most ethnologically rich American Indian site found in the Bay Area in at least a century.

"It should have been protected," said Jelmer Eerkens, a professor of archaeology at UC Davis who visited the site as a guest scholar.”The developers have the right to develop their land, but at least the information contained in the site should have been protected and samples should have been saved so that they could be studied in the future.”

The shell mound was first documented in Larkspur in 1907, but no one knew its significance until a developer decided to build homes, prompting an examination of the grounds.

Archaeologists brought in

The development was approved by the city in 2010, but the developer, Larkspur Land 8 Owner LLC, was required under the California Environmental Quality Act to bring in archaeologists to study the shell mound under the direction of American Indian monitors before it could build.

The developers hired San Francisco’s Holman & Associates Archaeological Consultants to conduct an excavation, and that firm spent the past year and a half on the site, calling in 25 archaeologists and 10 other specialists to study aspects of the mound. As required by the environmental act, their work was monitored by the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria, who were designated the most likely descendants of Larkspur’s indigenous people.

The American Indian leaders ultimately decided how the findings would be handled, and they defended their decision to remove and rebury the human remains and burial artifacts.

"The philosophy of the tribe in general is that we would like to protect our cultural resources and leave them as is," said Nick Tipon, a longtime member of the Sacred Sites Protection Committee of the Federated Indians of Graton Rancheria. “The notion that these cultural artifacts belong to the public is a colonial view.”

But Eerkens and several other top archaeologists said a lot more could have been done to protect the shell mound. The problem was that the work was done under a confidentiality agreement, so little was known about it until March when some of the archaeologists discussed their work during a Society for California Archaeology symposium in Visalia.

Full article

(via black-footed)


artslantstreet:

work by toronto-based street artist JULY i. more here: http://bit.ly/1e5oOLV

(via black-footed)


barrio-dandy:

Picture of Talented Artist, Painter, Musician and Social Activist Joel Galarza of Los Angeles Based band “Aztlan Underground”. A Los Angeles Indigenous Punk Style Icon! This man definitely speaks through his actions and his genuine and sincere aesthetic! A representation of who he is and what empowers him! Much Respect!
Picture taken by Javie Martinez.

barrio-dandy:

Picture of Talented Artist, Painter, Musician and Social Activist Joel Galarza of Los Angeles Based band “Aztlan Underground”. A Los Angeles Indigenous Punk Style Icon! This man definitely speaks through his actions and his genuine and sincere aesthetic! A representation of who he is and what empowers him! Much Respect!

Picture taken by Javie Martinez.

(via black-footed)


Q
Correction from original anon: The main character in Julie of the Wolves was Yupik, not Inuk. I got my terms wrong. She's a girl of maybe twelve who sets off into the tundra on her own using the survival skills her seal-hunting dad taught her after a forced marriage goes south. She convinces a wolf pack to adopt her and that's the main attraction of the story, watching her interact with wolves. Just thought I'd add more information in case any of your followers are confused.
Anonymous
A

Thanks! - mod M


fyeahindigenousfashion:

via Jeff Slim—follow them on Tumblr at theallelectrickitchen!

This Thursday these t-shirts will be available at the IAIA MoCNA Summer/Fall Exhibitions. Opening Reception with Beyond Buckskin Boutique. Check out the event!
The Musuem of Contemporary Native Arts is located at 108 Cathedral Pl, Santa Fe, NMThursday August 21, 5-7pm
I did the Hummingbird design and Asdzáá Olta’ created the Summer Months design.

fyeahindigenousfashion:

via Jeff Slim—follow them on Tumblr at theallelectrickitchen!

This Thursday these t-shirts will be available at the IAIA MoCNA Summer/Fall Exhibitions. Opening Reception with Beyond Buckskin Boutique. Check out the event!

The Musuem of Contemporary Native Arts is located at 108 Cathedral Pl, Santa Fe, NM
Thursday August 21, 5-7pm

I did the Hummingbird design and Asdzáá Olta’ created the Summer Months design.


…the government sees aboriginal justice initiatives (aimed at aboriginal offenders) and a national DNA database for missing persons as appropriate measures…Surely tracking indigenous girls’ DNA so they can be identified after they die is not the starting point for justice. Indigenous women want to matter before we go missing. We want our lives to matter as much as our deaths; our stake in the present political struggle for indigenous resurgence is as vital as the future.

So do we need an inquiry?

We need to stop the killing of 15-year-old native girls. We need to put an end to the abduction of indigenous women. We need to overhaul a justice system in which justice is so distorted that it is no longer recognizable. We need no more excuses, no more condolences, no more lists of missing women. We need an end to treating violence as mundane.

An inquiry will only help if it has action attached and if it shifts power into the hands of indigenous women, meaning it is led by indigenous women…Accountability means supporting existing anti-violence measures already being initiated by indigenous communities. These include rite-of-passage ceremonies to restore honour for young women, the Moosehide Campaign in which native boys and men take on culturally-relevant responsibilities to end violence toward women, and mentoring between girls and women which fosters the resurgence of women’s cultural roles at a local level…Accountability means supporting indigenous visions of justice, restoring our humanity and upholding girls’ resistance and leadership.

Treating our deaths as unremarkable is a form of violence that needs to stop along with the murders themselves. Taking steps to end the violence now is the only route to justice.



Q
The question about kids' books made me wonder -- have you read Julie of the Wolves? If so, any thoughts on its problematicness or lack thereof? It was my introduction to Inuit culture but it was written by a non-native person in the 1970s and I don't know how accurate it really was.
Anonymous
A

doddlekit:

reclaimingthenativetag:

I haven’t read this book, sorry. And even if I did, I’m not Inuk so I couldn’t say how problematic/accurate it is or not. - mod M

If its the book im thinking of didnt yall reblog,.or someone submit, on how the female half-ndn was based off of sterotypes and how she slepted on the graves of her ancseters to feel ‘closer,’ to them or something?

The book you’re referring to is Volkswagen Blues, a book I read in my French class. This is Julie of the Wolves. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julie_of_the_Wolves)

It sounds gross tbh, especially since when they made live action adaptions of it, they used non-Native actors and for the making of the movie, and the fact that ‘Andy Young traveled to Nunavut in 2008 with the intention of finding a young Inuk or Inupiat to play the role of Julie, but stated in April 2008 that he was in discussion with a non-Inuk to play the role because they “didn’t find the person that we felt was going to breathe the right kind of feeling into the story,”’ - mod M


thisiseverydayracism:

#OfficerGoFuckYourself Threatens to Kill Ferguson Livestreamers

The scene was witnessed by Infowars reporter Joe Biggs who was also filming the incident. The clip shows a Ferguson officer with his gun raised pointing it directly at a citizen journalist who was live streaming at the time.

“Oh my God, gun raised, gun raised,” states the journalist, before Biggs remarks, “gun pointed.”

“My hands are up bro, my hands are up,” states the journalist before the cop responds, “I’m going to f***ing kill you, get back, get back!”

“You’re going to kill him?” asks another individual before the journalist asks, “did he just threaten to kill me?”

When the cop is asked for his name he responds, “go fuck yourself.”


Q
Hello! I'm non-Native and I feel the need to tell you that I really appreciate the Native culture and all respect for people of native descent, that I truly believe to be the purest spirits on earth. I wanted to ask you what is your sincere opinion on people of non-native descent that are down on helping your peoples' communities? And what can we do? I hope I'm not saying anything wrong or bad. Much appreciation.
Anonymous
A

The first part of this ask is iffy but like, it’s great to receive help from non-Natives provided they don’t have this white saviour mentality. try to speak over us and the like. As for what can you do, just help bring awareness to our struggles. It’s like that one post I just reblogged. You don’t need to be Native to shed light on the things we face. Donate to things that aid Native people when you can, support Native artists, shut down people who are racist towards Native people (and others too), etc. There’s so much that can be done to support Native people. Don’t stay silent. - mod M