alunaes:

alunaes:

borrachitabeba:

HEY! Can everyone please take like 2 seconds to reblog this, my tia has besn missing for about a month and everyone is very worried about her. Spreading this in any way would be very helpful, especially if youre in the texas area. THANK YOU!!!

Reblog this everyone.

REBLOG THIS EVERYONE. YOU WOULD WANT PEOPLE TO HELP IF IT WERE YOU.

alunaes:

alunaes:

borrachitabeba:

HEY! Can everyone please take like 2 seconds to reblog this, my tia has besn missing for about a month and everyone is very worried about her. Spreading this in any way would be very helpful, especially if youre in the texas area. THANK YOU!!!

Reblog this everyone.

REBLOG THIS EVERYONE.
YOU WOULD WANT PEOPLE TO HELP IF IT WERE YOU.

(via angrywocunited)


idlenomorewisconsin:

21st

CENSORED NEWS: Meet Josephine Mandamin (Anishinaabekwe) The “Water Walker” #IdleNoMore

With a copper pail of water in one hand and a staff in the other, Josephine Mandamin, an Anishabaabewe grandmother took on a sacred walk, traversing over 10,900 miles around each of the Great Lakes. She is known as a “water walker.” According to the Michigan Sea Grant, the Great Lakes shoreline is equal to almost 44% of the circumference of the earth. - Read More
»

Tom Goldtooth of the Dakota people in Minnesota and a spokesperson f the Indigenous Environmental Network opened the meeting by reminding the gathering that the indigenous movement “has never been idle” in its work, a reference to the Idle No More movement. He in turn called upon Josephine Mandamin (Anishinaabekwe), an Ojibway woman also known as Grandmother Water Walker who is noted for her work to protect the Great Lakes and other waterways, to offer a prayer.

First speaking in her native language and then in English Mandamin said, “The creator gave us the duty to take care of our mother the earth the way we would take care of our own mother or grandmother.. She called women the “water carriers” and told the climate activists, “We are women are the water carriers, the life carriers. The little droplet of water is what unites us all.” She told the group, “We have come here to speak to the powers-that-be, to the corporations about the climate issues and to ask,What are you going to do about it.’ And I ask you too, ‘What are you going to do?’” Read More

»

Josephine Mandamin has walked more than 17,000 kilometres to raise consciousness of Great Lakes pollution 

Q: What was the biggest challenge?

A: Our walkers were always having blisters but our feet got used to callouses after a while.

Q: Which Great Lake do you like best?

A:I think Lake Superior was the one we really respected a lot in terms of it’s majestic length and coolness of the water. It was very nice. You couldn’t swim in it because it was so cold. Lake Huron is my home water and I really have a lot of personal attachment to the water there. I’m from Manitoulin Island and Georgian Bay was pristine waters when I was there.

Q: What was your worst experience?

A: Lake Erie was a place where we were called down. On the American side, people were driving by saying ‘Crazy indians’ when we walked through Detroit, it was really scary. When we got back (over the Ambassador Bridge) to Windsor my son said ‘it’s good to be back home.’

Q: You’ve mentioned the pollution. Did anything give you reason for hope?

A:Lake Michigan is a beautiful lake and it flows into Lake Superior and there’s hope that we can still keep our waters pristine if we keep the motor boats and the gas out and get back to canoes. Where there are motorized boats, you can see the oil and gas in the water.

Grandmother attended, and did the Water Ceremony in NYC Sept., 21st 

Water Is Life: Especially If You Walk The Walk



baapi-makwa:

makwa gaye jiibayag niimi’idiwag (bear and northern lights)

baapi-makwa:

makwa gaye jiibayag niimi’idiwag (bear and northern lights)

(via baapi-makwa)


Q
Madison has been found ...
Anonymous
A

Has she? I’m glad to hear that! - mod M


gatitaborrachita:

meltingmarshmallow:

gatitaborrachita:

So I’m going to rant here a bit. The time of year has arrived where empathy and consideration go out the window. The image on the left is an ignorant portrayal of what is supposed to be a native woman. The image on the right is in fact, a native woman. There is no excuse for any race or culture to be compacted into a costume for one night of “fun”. Portrayals like these strip us of our humanity. I do not support any person who decides to make the conscious effort to perpetuate a vile act such as dressing up as something you’re not. You are not honoring me. You do not care about me. You are not going to use my culture to spice up your dull life for a night. I’m human. I’m native. I’m sick and tired.

Okay, but do keep in mind that “dressing up as something you’re not” is literally the point of Halloween. (Straying from what it originally was meant to be perhaps, but nonetheless, what it is today.) 
I am not trying to un-justify your offense to this particular costume (it isn’t something I would ever wear) but perhaps think of it this way:
Let’s say someone, a non-native american, really likes the Disney movie ‘Pocahontas’ and wants to dress up as the titular character for Halloween. (We all know that Pocahontas isn’t exactly an accurate portrayal of the real story but let’s set that aside for now.) Or maybe even dressing up as Tiger Lily to accompany a friend’s Peter Pan costume.
Would you consider this to be racist or offensive?
You say there is no excuse for anyone to dress up in the aesthetic of any race or culture but the fact of the matter is, it happens all the time, with every kind of culture + race, and I don’t think it is ever really meant to be harmful in the way you are perceiving it. Spirit halloween is shitty for plenty of reasons though, and it shows in a lot of their costumes as well. Especially anything accompanied with the word “sexy”… and everyone knows nothing is accurately designed or portrayed. All I am trying to say is that I personally believe there are a few exceptions to your claim.

Actually, let’s talk about Pocahontas and Tiger Lily for a secondThey’re both problematic characters for many reasonsI have a problem with Matoaka’s (Pocahontas’ real name) portrayal mainly because of the inaccuracy. She was a child when she met John Smith. She’s hypersexualized in her short buckskin dress and made to look like an older woman. Indeed it is not necessarily problematic to wear a costume that is 100 percent identical to the movie, but it does not sit right with me.
Tiger Lily on the otherhand, doesn’t speak throughout the entirety of her scenes. The “Why is the Red Man Red?” segment had me squirming awkwardly everytime I would see it. It’s not fun watching blatant racism being thrown in your face at such a young age. (If you don’t think that was one of the most offensive scenes you can fuck right off)
Costumes and representations that hypersexualize and demean native women perpetuate violence. Violence among indigenous women is an epidemic that has been overlooked throughout time. Harmful stereotypes in the media play a significant part in violence amongst indigenous women.
1 in 3 native women will be raped in her lifetime. 70 percent of abusers are non-native people.1,186 reported cases of missing indigenous women in Canada has called for a national inquiry that is STILL overlooked
Overall, this is extremely toxic. Cultural appropriation should not occur as a basis for costumes. There are so many other creative and original ideas one can muster up, but using race and culture stings like no other.

gatitaborrachita:

meltingmarshmallow:

gatitaborrachita:

So I’m going to rant here a bit. The time of year has arrived where empathy and consideration go out the window. The image on the left is an ignorant portrayal of what is supposed to be a native woman. The image on the right is in fact, a native woman.
There is no excuse for any race or culture to be compacted into a costume for one night of “fun”.
Portrayals like these strip us of our humanity.
I do not support any person who decides to make the conscious effort to perpetuate a vile act such as dressing up as something you’re not.
You are not honoring me. You do not care about me. You are not going to use my culture to spice up your dull life for a night.
I’m human. I’m native. I’m sick and tired.

Okay, but do keep in mind that “dressing up as something you’re not” is literally the point of Halloween. (Straying from what it originally was meant to be perhaps, but nonetheless, what it is today.) 

I am not trying to un-justify your offense to this particular costume (it isn’t something I would ever wear) but perhaps think of it this way:

Let’s say someone, a non-native american, really likes the Disney movie ‘Pocahontas’ and wants to dress up as the titular character for Halloween. (We all know that Pocahontas isn’t exactly an accurate portrayal of the real story but let’s set that aside for now.) Or maybe even dressing up as Tiger Lily to accompany a friend’s Peter Pan costume.

Would you consider this to be racist or offensive?

You say there is no excuse for anyone to dress up in the aesthetic of any race or culture but the fact of the matter is, it happens all the time, with every kind of culture + race, and I don’t think it is ever really meant to be harmful in the way you are perceiving it. Spirit halloween is shitty for plenty of reasons though, and it shows in a lot of their costumes as well. Especially anything accompanied with the word “sexy”… and everyone knows nothing is accurately designed or portrayed. All I am trying to say is that I personally believe there are a few exceptions to your claim.

Actually, let’s talk about Pocahontas and Tiger Lily for a second
They’re both problematic characters for many reasons
I have a problem with Matoaka’s (Pocahontas’ real name) portrayal mainly because of the inaccuracy. She was a child when she met John Smith. She’s hypersexualized in her short buckskin dress and made to look like an older woman. Indeed it is not necessarily problematic to wear a costume that is 100 percent identical to the movie, but it does not sit right with me.

Tiger Lily on the otherhand, doesn’t speak throughout the entirety of her scenes.
The “Why is the Red Man Red?” segment had me squirming awkwardly everytime I would see it. It’s not fun watching blatant racism being thrown in your face at such a young age. (If you don’t think that was one of the most offensive scenes you can fuck right off)

Costumes and representations that hypersexualize and demean native women perpetuate violence. Violence among indigenous women is an epidemic that has been overlooked throughout time. Harmful stereotypes in the media play a significant part in violence amongst indigenous women.

1 in 3 native women will be raped in her lifetime. 70 percent of abusers are non-native people.
1,186 reported cases of missing indigenous women in Canada has called for a national inquiry that is STILL overlooked

Overall, this is extremely toxic. Cultural appropriation should not occur as a basis for costumes. There are so many other creative and original ideas one can muster up, but using race and culture stings like no other.

(via theonlyviableoption)


theonlyviableoption:

culturalappropriationon:

hardcorehousewife:

well dollskill was just taken off my list of all time favorite stores….

Unreal.

Fucking hell


sikssaapo-p:

WINNIPEG STUDENT KICKED OFF THE BUS FOR WEARING SWEATSHIRT SAYING: GOT LAND? THANK AN INDIANNOV 4- The day after the city of Winnipeg launched their new aboriginal relations division to help build relationships and give opportunities to aboriginal youth in the city, a complaint has arisen.A local high school student says she was unfairly kicked off a Winnipeg transit bus.And the girl and her brother say the city of Winnipeg isn’t taking their complaint seriously.VIDEO: http://aptn.ca/pages/news/2013/11/04/winnipeg-student-says-kicked-bus-sweatshirt-saying-got-land-thank-indian/CONTACT WINNIPEG TRANSIT:Toll-free (phone or fax): 1-877-311-4974 (4WPG)TTY: 204-986-1311Mail: 311 Services, 510 Main Street, Winnipeg, MB R3B 1B9http://www.winnipeg.ca/interhom/contact/default2.stm

sikssaapo-p:

WINNIPEG STUDENT KICKED OFF THE BUS FOR WEARING SWEATSHIRT SAYING: GOT LAND? THANK AN INDIAN

NOV 4- The day after the city of Winnipeg launched their new aboriginal relations division to help build relationships and give opportunities to aboriginal youth in the city, a complaint has arisen.

A local high school student says she was unfairly kicked off a Winnipeg transit bus.
And the girl and her brother say the city of Winnipeg isn’t taking their complaint seriously.

VIDEO: http://aptn.ca/pages/news/2013/11/04/winnipeg-student-says-kicked-bus-sweatshirt-saying-got-land-thank-indian/

CONTACT WINNIPEG TRANSIT:
Toll-free (phone or fax): 1-877-311-4974 (4WPG)
TTY: 204-986-1311
Mail: 311 Services, 510 Main Street, Winnipeg, MB R3B 1B9

http://www.winnipeg.ca/interhom/contact/default2.stm

(via theonlyviableoption)


baapi-makwa:

maang(loon in Ojibwe)

baapi-makwa:

maang(loon in Ojibwe)

(via theonlyviableoption)


mysoulhasgrowndeep-liketherivers:

millennialau:

Reporting of incident where this man fucking forcibly ran into @bdoulaoblongata with his walker while saying he is Darren Wilson. Protestors were protesting this location because owner stopped allowing black patrons to enter, only white patrons and pulled a gun out on protestors.

Video clips of him allowing white patrons only and locking door to come.

White people are sick

(via theonlyviableoption)


Q
Why would some native tribes erase the identity of their own people if they're part black?
Anonymous
A

Anti-black prejudice, basically. I’m not an expert on this, as I am not black myself, but I have heard the stories of people who are, who have had a difficult time in their own communities. I have specifically heard of difficulties with Black Cherokee people, but I’m aware it’s an issue that has a wider spread.

If you want to know more about this, you might look up people who are black NDNs and listen to their stories.

—Mod Ari